Wind Turbine Commissioning Ceremony

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Standing at 415 feet high, two new wind turbines now tower over the SC Johnson Waxdale facility. The spinning turbines help Waxdale generate, on average, 100 percent of its electrical energy onsite. A view inside the largest onsite, company-owned wind turbine manufacturing project in the Midwest, now powering SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. The addition of the turbines means that products made at Waxdale – trusted brands like Scrubbing Bubbles®, Glade® and Windex® – will now be made using clean energy. Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson speaks passionately about the company's commitment to renewable energy use as powers up two new wind turbines at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest manufacturing facility. Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson officially commissioned the largest company-owned wind turbine manufacturing project in the Midwest for the first time at the company's Waxdale manufacturing facility. The wind turbines will produce about eight million kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity annually, enough to power 700 homes in a year. Susan Hedman, U.S. EPA Region 5 Administrator, speaks at the wind turbine commissioning ceremony at SC Johnson, and congratulates the company's leadership in sustainable manufacturing. SC Johnson is the only manufacturer in the country that has installed these state-of-the-art Vensys turbines. At the commissioning of the wind turbine project at SC Johnson's Waxdale manufacturing facility Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson shares his excitement for the powering up of the wind turbines for the first time. The turbines mark another step forward in the company's goal of increasing worldwide renewable energy use to 44 percent of total electricity by 2016, allowing SC Johnson to manufacture products while having an even smaller impact on the environment. Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson, powers up two new wind turbines, which will allow the company's largest manufacturing facility to produce trusted brands like Windex® using clean energy.

Construction Progress

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During the hub blade assembly lift, guide wires are used to help guide and direct the assembly and maintain the position and stability. During these lifts there is a strict safety protocol that measures the wind speed at the top of the crane to ensure winds are calm enough to complete the lift safely and successfully. The wind turbines are located at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. The hub assembly inches closer to the generator for attachment on the Vensys 1.5 MW 82 wind turbines being installed at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. The nacelle -- which houses the auxiliary crane for maintenance and yaw system that allows the turbine to turn a full 360 degrees to face the direction of the wind -- is round like a golf ball. as It does not require a gear box to operate because it uses permanent magnets and direct drive technology. The trailing crane has let go of the trailing blade, but guide wires are still in place to maintain stability and control and the guide wire is now active on the trailing blade, during installation at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility. This is a close up of the hub of one of the new wind turbines with the blades attached at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility. The blade connection to the interior of the hub is visible in the center of the photo. The center ring is where the hub is attached to the generator. The tower portion of the wind turbines at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, is comprised of five sections. Here, the first tower section is being placed onto the base ring to cover the electrical equipment and controls that have already been installed. The hub blade assembly is being lifted for attachment to the generator on the one of the wind turbines at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility. The generator is in place on the nacelle -- which houses the auxiliary crane for maintenance and yaw system that allows the turbine to turn a full 360 degrees to face the direction of the wind. On top of the nacelle is the wind weather equipment to monitor wind speed and direction. A computer uses that information to direct the nacelle on which direction to face and the necessary pitch of the blades. When generating energy for Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, this feature ensures the turbines are generating energy to capacity. As construction progresses on the wind turbines being installed at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, one of the wind turbine blades is being attached to the hub. The addition of the two wind turbines will help the facility produce an average of 100 percent of its electrical energy onsite. Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, is now home to two wind turbines that will help power the 2.2-million- square-foot facility. Here, the nacelle, which houses the auxiliary crane for maintenance and yaw system that allows the turbine to turn a full 360 degrees to face the direction of the wind, awaits installation upon completion of the tower construction. The last tower section of one of the new wind turbines moves into place at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. On the ground, the hub and blade await installation. The two new wind turbines will help the facility produce an average of 100 percent of its electrical energy onsite. During a night lift, the generator of one of the wind turbines is being installed on the nacelle, as one of the wind turbines at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, nears completion. The hub assembly is close to being attached to the generator on the wind turbine installation at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. The small square visible on the hub is one of three small doors (located between each blade) used for maintenance. A technician is to be able to rappel down and inspect the blade for damage if needed. The turbines will work in conjunction with the existing cogeneration system to produce an average of 100 percent of the electrical energy needed onsite.

Turbines In Operation

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Both wind turbines are visible from the entrance to Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing facility, located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. Waxdale is the largest and fastest single-site aerosol producer in the world, producing 430 million aerosol cans each year. The facility has some lines capable of producing up to 600 aerosols per minute. Sunrise over Mt. Pleasant, Wis., showcasing the installed wind turbines at Waxdale, SC Johnson's largest global manufacturing plant. The turbines began generating energy for Waxdale on December 18, 2012 and will help the facility produce an average of 100 percent of its electrical energy onsite.

Other Renewable Energy Initiatives

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SC Johnson's two cogeneration systems at Waxdale, the company's largest global manufacturing facility use waste methane gas from a nearby public landfill and clean burning natural gas, the turbines 85 percent of the facility's electrical energy. It eliminates more than 47,267 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year. In 2012, SC Johnson added three SWIFT mini wind turbines to the roof of the company's Lowell, Arkansas sales office. Depending on wind conditions, the turbines should be capable of generating as much as 3,600 kWh of electricity annually. This will keep 2.5 metric tons of GHGs out of the atmosphere annually. In May 2012, the company launched a new biofuel initiative at the SC Johnson factory in Surabaya, Indonesia, using waste husks from rice grains as a fuel source. Consuming rice husks rather than natural gas, the Surabaya boiler is expected to generate about 6,000,000 kcal per hour to heat water used in mosquito coil production. It is expected to reduce GHG emissions by 7,090 metric tons per year. In 2007, SC Johnson launched a biofuel initiative at the company's factory in Medan, Indonesia, using waste palm shells as a fuel source to heat water for mosquito coil production. This transfers a waste product back into the value chain with minimal impact, and has cut greenhouse gas emissions at the factory by more than 15 percent. It reduces local diesel fuel use by 80 percent. Pledge® is one of SC Johnson's most trusted brands and will now be made with clean energy at Waxdale, the company's largest global manufacturing plant which is located in Mt. Pleasant, Wis. Other well-known household products made at Waxdale include Glade®, Windex®, Scrubbing Bubbles®, Shout®, Raid® and OFF!®. In 2010, SC Johnson began testing three SWIFT mini wind turbines at its global headquarters campus in Racine, Wis. The goal has been to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and, in addition, to raise awareness that renewable energy can be used in urban settings. This initiative cut greenhouse gas emissions by about 580 pounds in the first year. SC Johnson's wind turbine in Mijdrecht, The Netherlands, helps power SC Johnson's European manufacturing facility known as Europlant. Completed in 2009, it was the first company-owned windmill and generates 50 percent of the electricity for the local factory. Several solar projects are helping provide hot water heating for the company's facility in Shanghai, China. One provides hot water for food service and other office needs. Solar-heated waste water from the facility's steam piping network aids aerosol production. The Quality Control lab uses solar-heated water as well. This reduced greenhouse gas emissions by about 70,000 metric tons per year.